McDonald Family of Logan County

The McDonald Family of Logan County, WV

The History of West Virginia, Old and New
and West Virginia Biography
Volume II Biographical, Page 550-551
The American Historical Society, Inc.,
Chicago and New York
Published 1923

MCDONALD FAMILY. Among the pioneer families in the southern part of the state perhaps no one group has shown greater unity in purpose and enterprise than the McDonalds of Logan County. As the name indicates, they are of Scotch ancestry, and they have manifested the Scotch traits of thrift and forehanded judgment in holding on to and developing lands and other interests that came to them by inheritance. Of the present generation two of the prominent members are Bruce McDonald, of Logan, and Millard McDonald, of Mallory, and their father, William Wallace McDonald, is also a prominent figure in the article that follows.

It was before the Revolutionary war that the first members of this family appeared in this region of Virginia. They settled on Tom’s Creek in Montgomery County. The ancestor of the family now under consideration was Edward McDonald, who settled and purchased a large tract on Clear Fork of Guyan in that part of Virginia now Wyoming County, West Virginia. He located there about 1787, purchased part of the Gordon and Cloyd survey on Huff’s Creek, and these lands are still in the possession of the McDonald family. Edward McDonald developed a farm and was extensively engaged in the live stock business in that pioneer epoch. All the McDonalds of the present have been hard workers.

Joseph McDonald, a son of Edward, lived to the age of eighty years. He was the father of William Wallace McDonald, who was born at the old home place in Wyoming County, April 1, 1817. In 1844 he moved to the month of Huff’s Creek, where he first purchased a farm and later acquired 14,000 acres of land, still retained by his descendants and now owned by the W. W. McDonald Land Company, which was incorporated in 1913 to handle this and other property interests. Individual members of the family have added large tracts to this original holding. A large part of these lands were under laid with valuable deposits of coal, and some of the principal coal operations in this part of state are on the McDonald property. These include the Standard Island Creek operations at Taplin, the Logan Mining Company’s operations at Earling, the Mallory Coal Company on and at the mouth of Huff’s Creek, the Logan-Elkhorn Coal Corporation, the Long-Flame Coal Company.

William Wallace McDonald died at his home place on Huff’s Creek, August 15, 1902. He had to teach himself, but was thoroughly well educated and a student and a thinker all his life. As a young man he taught a number of schools in Wyoming County. His brother Isaac had inherited the old homestead, and while William Wallace had some financial assistance from his father, he was, generally speaking, the architect of his own destiny. He went in for high grade live stock, and at one time owned a fine herd of Durham cattle. He was a liberal supporter of the Methodist Church, and his home was always open to the Methodist ministers. He was a democrat, was in sympathy with the South at the time of the Civil war, and at one time was taken prisoner by Northern troops, but soon released.

The first wife of William Wallace McDonald was Minerva Dingess, a sister of John and Guy Dingess. Guy Dingess lived below Logan in Guyan Valley. By the first marriage there were two children. Charles L, died at the old home in 1888, at the age of forty-one. His sister, Mary A., lives with her son, Warren Perry, and is the widow of Oliver Perry, who died in 1895.

The second wife of William Wallace McDonald was Parthena Scaggs. She was born in Montgomery County, and died at the old home in 1873. She was the mother of the following children: Millard, who is mentioned in later paragraphs; Bruce; Bilton, who is unmarried, lives at Logan and is president of the W. W. McDonald Land Company; Wayne, born in 1864, who was a merchant and timber man and died in 1900; Ann Brook, born in 1866, died in California in 1908, and was the wife of C. M. Turley, of Boone County, now deceased; Miriam Alice, born in 1868, is the wife of John Robinson, a farmer of Cambria, Virginia; Marshall, born in 1872, died in 1901.

Bruce McDonald, the second son, was born at the mouth of Huff’s Creek, February 8, 1860. He and his brother Bilton attended the free schools of their neighborhood, and after getting all the education they could there they each taught one term of school. Then, in quest of further education, they walked overland to Athens, Mercer County, where they attended a term of school at Old Concord Church, a school taught by Captain French, and out of which has since been developed the Concord State Normal.

After the close of the term they walked home and taught another term of school at a salary of $18 a month. Following this they left home to attend school again, and this time they traveled by rafts down the Guyan River to its mouth, went by train to Hinton and thence walked to the Concord School. After the second term at Concord the brothers continued teaching for several years. In the fall of 1885 Bruce and Bilton entered the National Normal University at Lebanon, Ohio, and remained there at their studies for about one year. In 1887 Bilton was elected superintendent of schools for Logan County, but on account of ill health was unable to fill out the term and his brother Bruce took his place. Many people in this section of West Virginia recall Bruce McDonald as a capable teacher in various localities. At one time he taught in the Town of Logan. He and Martin Jones were teachers of the two-room school conducted in a frame building that stood on the present site of the splendid high school at Logan. Bruce McDonald’s first official position was as a member of the school board in the Triadelphia District.

Later, in 1904, he was elected a member of the Legislature, and served until 1908, and was a member of the committees on mines and mining and education. He was a commissioner of the County Court from 1912 to 1919, and the last six years president of the court. For six years he was associated in partnership with his brother Millard in the mercantile business at the mouth of Huff’s Creek. They dealt in a large range of commodities, including ginseng and timber, which they rafted down the river to market. On leaving Huffs Creek Bruce McDonald moved to Taplin, where he lived and continued in business for fifteen years. He brought his goods up the Guyan River on a push boat, and at the same time sent large quantities of timber down the stream by rafts.

Bruce McDonald became a resident of the City of Logan in 1912. He and the other heirs in 1913 incorporated the 14,000- acre estate of their father as the W. W. McDonald Land Company, Incorporated, of which Bilton is president, Bruce, vice president, and S. E. McDonald, a son of Millard, secretary and treasurer. Bruce McDonald is one of the organizers and is vice president of the Guyan Valley Bank, and is a member of the board of directors of the First National Bank. He is a steward and trustee of the First Methodist Episcopal Church, South, and has helped to build several churches. Fraternally he is affiliated with the Masonic Lodge and Chapter, West Virginia Consistory No. 1 of the Scottish Rite at Wheeling, and Beni-Kedem Temple of the Mystic Shrine at Charleston. He also belongs to the Elks and is a democrat. Mr. McDonald is unmarried.

Millard McDonald, the oldest son of his father’s second marriage, acquired his education in the home schools and as a young man he married Vicia Buchanan, daughter of John Buchanan. She was born near Matewan on Big Sandy. They have four living children: S. Elmer, who is secretary of the W. W. McDonald Land Company, is a director of the First National Bank of Logan and president of the Merchants and Miners Bank; Lillie May, wife of H. H. Oakley, who is associated with the Guyan Supply Company of Logan; Nora, wife of W . D. Phipps, of the Logan Mercantile Company; and Mabel, wife of Dr. C. B. Morris, a dentist of Stollings in Logan County.

Millard McDonald and wife are Methodists, and he is a member of the board of stewards in his home church and, like his father and brother, has assisted actively in church building. Millard McDonald was born in 1858. For four years he was a merchant on Huff’s Creek and for many years has continued his operations as a stock dealer.

*The content on this page is for educational purposes and is used in accordance with the Fair Use Law (Per Title 17—United States Code—Section 107).

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1969 Phone Book

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1969 Logan C&P Phone Book 1969 Logan Phone Book courtesy of Bob Piros. 1969 Logan Telephone Book Excerpts  

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Chauncey Hollow Triple Killing, August 1927

Logan Banner
March 18, 2015

Shootings, murders and maimings
By Dwight Williamson

There were accounts later that indicated that the Sheriff of Logan County, none other than Tennis Hatfield, Devil Anse’s son, was behind the deaths at Chauncey Hollow in what was believed to be a politically motivated action, but also involved moonshine.

Read the full article about other Logan County shootings, murders and maimings.


Charleston Gazette
Friday, August 19, 1927

Eye-Witness of Logan Slaying Implicates Trio

Millard Porter’s Surrender And Confession Sends Sheriff’s Posse on New Hunt in Mountains.

Mitt and Bird Nelson And Isom Curry Slew Dry Agent and Two Youths on Ginseng Hunt For Fear They Would Discover Stills Nearby.

Logan, Aug. 18. — Leading a posse of fresh officers. Sheriff Tennis Hatfield re-entered the mountains south of here this afternoon to continue the search for Mitt and Bird Nelson and Isom Curry, named in the confession of Millard Porter as the slayers of Ed Hensley, state prohibition officer, his son, Don, and Ernest Marcum to Chauncey Hollow Tuesday. Porter told the sheriff of the plans of the Nelson brothers and Curry to make their way over either the Virginia or Kentucky, borders, and the second posse, which is made up of state troopers sent from Charleston by Governor Dora and deputy marshals hopes to Intercept the fleeing men. In the meantime, this first posse taken out of Logan Tuesday afternoon by the sheriff continues scurrying the mountains along Island creek. Witness Porter, who surrendered yesterday afternoon to B. T. Browning, a private citizen residing near the village of Chauncey, declared that he was an unarmed and unwilling witness of the ambush of Hensley’s party of ginseng hunters, according to his confession made public by the prosecuting attorney today. Porter, who is a miner, said he went to the home of Mitt Nelson in Chauncey Tuesday morning to buy liquor. Soon after he arrived, Bird Nelson and Isom Curry came in and began a discussion with Mitt of the activities of the “Dangers”. Porter said that the three men knew that Hensley was a prohibition officer, and that they expressed the fear that Hensley would find their stills and come back with “the marshals”. Finally one of the men proposed that they “go up the branch and run the ‘Bangers out”. Porter said. He accepted an invitation to go along, but did not think there would be any shooting, although Mitt Nelson was armed with a riffle, and Isom Curry and Bird Nelson with pistols. Porter said he was unarmed, and stopped about 75 feat from the camp of the ginseng hunters.  Saw two shot he said. Mitt Nelson stopped about 40 feet away, but Bird Nelson walked to within four or five feet of the boy who was sitting down eating out of a pan.” “Mitt hollered for them to ‘throw up their hands’ and the big man (apparently Ed. Hensley) said, ‘I’m a officer of the law’ and drew his gun Porter said “Isom shot the big man he continued, “and Bird shot the boy who was eating out of the pan.” Mitt Nelson also fired some shots but Porter said he didn’t know who killed the other youth, nor who wounded Howard Tomblin, another boy, who was shot as he was running way. Don Hensley, Marcum and Tomblin were about 18 years old. Three brothers of Ed Hensley. Dave Stonewall am Pearl, and Dave’s two sons, Munroe and Cundiff, and Peter Carter and another. man were members of the party. They scattered for safety, and Dave went to Logan to notify the sheriff. The first posse found Tomblin some distance from the scene of the ambush but the three dead men lay where they fell. Each was shot through the head. Tomblin was shot in the side. The officers also found three stills in the hollow, one quite close to the camp. The posse began a search for three men answering the description given by Dave Hensley of three men who came to the camp Monday, shortly after it was established, and warned the party to leave before noon the next day. Porter said he knew nothing of this. Continuing his story, Porter said he fled with the Nelsons and Curry down the right branch of the hollow to a mountain back of Mitt Nelson’s home, which they ascended and concealed themselves on top of a large cliff. There they lay from noon Tuesday until 10 o’clock yesterday morning. Members of’ the posse frequently passed near them. When the hunt passed on to another section of the community, the four made their way down Chafin Branch to a secluded hollow where then Nelsons and Curry fell asleep and Porter slipped away.

Repeats Confession

He went back to the home of Mr. Browning, told him of the shooting and asked Mr. Browning to arrange his surrender to the sheriff. This morning Porter repeated his story in the presence of the sheriff and John Chafin, the prosecuting attorney. He also said that the three men had told him of the plans to escape over the mountains to Virginia and Kentucky.

WITNESS OF THREE SLAYINGS CONFESSES  Sheriff Hatfield, who returned here about daybreak, left early this afternoon to resume the search. Funeral services for the three victims were held at the homes on Bart’s creek, north of the city, today. Tomblin, who is a patient in a local hospital, will recover. It is said Mart and Bills McCoy, father and son,  A. F. Roberts, Arch Adkins, Sherman Bragg and Moscow Adams, who had been held for investigation in connection with the ambush, will be released, the sheriff announced.


The Lima News
August 17, 1927

POSSE PURSUES MOONSHINERS IN TRIPLE SLAYING
Rifle Volleys From Ambush In Mountain Kill Three; One Wounded Missing TWO SUSPECTS ARRESTED
Tragedy Follows Warning of Two Days Ago; Campers Taken For Dry Agents

LOGAN, W.Va. Aug 17 — (AP) — Volleys from rifles of moonshiners in ambush, who are thought to have taken a party of campers for spies, today had raised the total of such killings In the mountains of West Virginia to four in less than two months. Three men, one a state prohibition agent, dropped under the sudden fire which whipped their camp on Island Creek yesterday. Gus J. Simmons, another prohibition agent, was shot from ambush Jury 11 while searching for moonshine stills. Two men were under arrest today in connection with the ambush yesterday in which Ed Hensley, the prohibition agent, Don, his 18 year old son, and Ernest Marcum, all of Hart’s creek, were killed. The six surviving members of the party, one, Howard Tomlin, also of Hart’s creek, wounded, fled to shelter among the trees but had been accounted for today.

POSSE IN PURSUIT
Meanwhile a posse continued a search for the assailants. Dave Hensley, a brother of the slain man spread the alarm, escaping the withering fire in a dash thru the woods and tramping 14 miles for the posse. The bodies of the three slain men lay as they fell, bullets thru the head of each. Other members of the party clung to concealment in the woods until the posse appeared. Not until then, and not until the three, bodies had been carried over mountain trails to the nearest highway was the real search for the assailants be- gun. The attackers apparently fled immediately after the shootings. The attack had not been with- out some warning, however. Dave Hensley told posse men a party of men visited the two-day camp Monday, and warned them to be gone by noon the following day. But the warning was disregarded. A few minutes fire, and three lay dead, and the rest were scattered. Hensley said members of the were not searching for stills and, as far as posse men were able to learn, the fact that Ed Hensley was a prohibition agent was unknown to the attackers. Hart’s creek is about 39 miles north thru wooded mountain region from the scene of the killings. The two men arrested, Arch Adkins and A. F. Roberts, residents of the district, are held for questioning. Three stills were found during the search, one near the scene of the shooting.


Charleston Daily Mail
January 20, 1928

Sherman Nelson, co-defendant of Millard Porter who was given a life sentence last Tuesday when convicted of first degree murder in the Chauncey Hollow triple slaying of last August 15, is being tried in Logan Circuit Court on Friday. Both Nelson and Porter, together with the other three accused men who escaped, were indicted on five different counts for the murder of Dry Agent Ed Hensley, his son Don and Ernie Marcum in an alleged moonshiners’ attack on their ginseng camp. Following the killings two large stills were found close to the murder scene, and in his testimony on trial here Porter admitted the stills belonged to the attacking party. The other three accused men are Mitt and Bird Nelson. sons of Sherman Nelson, and Isom Curry. This trio escaped immediately following slayings and have been fugitives from justice since that very hour despite a lengthy man-hunt and the $2,000 reward out for their capture. When Sherman Nelson goes on trial same time Friday, the state will attempt to prove his part in an alleged conspiracy which preceded the actual killings.


Charleston Daily Mail
November 28, 1930

CHAUNCEY HOLLOW CASES ARE NOLLED
Indictments Against Alleged Slayers Dropped to Clear Court’s Docket

LOGAN, Nov. 28 — Terminating a three-year fruitless search for a trio of moonshiners wanted for the famous Chauncey Hollow triple killing of 1927, indictments were nolled in circuit court against Mitt Nelson, Bird Nelson and Isom Curry. They have been fugitives from justice since the day of the slaying. One of the four originally sought is now serving a life sentence in the state penitentiary. He is Millard Porter. The murdered men were Ed Hensley, Harts creek prohibition agent; his son, Don Hensley. and Ernie Marcum. The three were members of a Ginseng party camping in the Chauncey hollow woodland. The night prior to the killings, the Harts creekers were ordered out of the vicinity. The next morning as the campers were eating, the moonshiners bore down upon them with shotgun and pistol, killing three men and injuring Howard Tomblin, who later recovered. Sherman Nelson, father of the two hunted men, was under surveillance for a time, and was once tried as an accessory before the fact. He was acquitted. Recent public notice was drawn to the three-year-old killings by the appointment of Amos Sullivan as a special officer to probe the case. Sullivan, who since figured in the alleged attempted wrecking of a Madison newspaper office. The officer since has disappeared. The two Nelsons and Curry were indicted on three murder counts for the triple slaying and were also jointly indicted for ownership and operation of a moonshine still found near the scene of the killings. There was also an indictment against them for maiming Tomblin. All four indictments were nolled. Thirteen murder indictments were included in the 157 nolled and warrants quashed during the October term of Logan Circuit Court, just ended. This large number of cases was wiped off the docket by Judge Naaman Jackson in order to start the new year. beginning with the January term, with a clean slate.

The complete record of cases dropped during the term was entered on the law docket this week. They were nolled for various reasons, including absence of defendant or witnesses, lack of evidence technical errors and other sufficient causes. An order to grant bail to Lottie McRandle, a negro charged with husband-slaying, was revoked Tuesday by Judge Jackson, circuit court. The woman was re-arrested shortly afterwards and placed in the Logan county jail pending action of the January grand jury. Cancellation or the order “was made allegedly due to misrepresentation of the facts at the bond hearing”.

1927-1930 Newspaper Clippings Credit: www.angelfire.com/bc3/conley/EdHensley.html

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Chapmanville, WV

History and Photos of Chapmanville, WV

The town of Chapmanville was founded in 1800 and named after Ted Chapman.

The Chapman Home Place by Dawn Michelle
The Chapman Home Place History of the house.. First Chapman home .. remained in the family until 1983-84, when the property was sold to Arby;s then to Hardee’s… During the era of the civil war that came through Chapmanville it was used as a hospital for the confederates. The Chapman family(in which the town is named after) was able to stay on at the house and it was returned to them after the war.. The Chapman cemetery was part of the main yard for many years until the road came through so this is the reason for the division. There were tunnels that lead from the basement to the Guyandotte River for transportation and bringing in the wounded and a escape route.. The tunnels would of been under the cemetery and the Chapmanville Towers.Of course they have closed in over the years. The house was in the shape of a cross ..Even when my father (Jimmie Chapman) was born 1930 the left over surgical equipment of time period was still in the basement and my grandfather (Gerorge S. Chapman) threw away the equipment. As a child we weren’t suppose to go in the basement but of course we did but didn’t stay long due to the creepiness of it. The last generation to live in the house was my grandparents George/Easter Toney Chapman along with his 11 children.. Now I don’t have proof of this but it was told by George that his arm was buried in the yard. He and his brother had been at the barn and came running toward the house and his brother was carrying a gun . His brother fell and the gun went off taking off my grandfather’s arm. He was 6 yrs old by what he said. He and his family lived up on the hill at the lower end of Chapmanville. His grandfather was living in the Chapman home at that time. He told us kids that it was in this yard were his arm was buried .. If so it would of been in the part of the yard where the ramp to 119 in front of the old Exxon station. There was also two well known battles of the war that happened in Chapmanville. The Kanawha troop fought at the top of Chapmanville mountain on Sept. 25, 1861 . The other was at Godby Branch (can’t recall the date not the name of the troop.) A historical member from Charleston came and looked at the house before the sale to see if they would be willing to restore it, however they took all the information they could get to add it to the books but said the house needed a lot of repairs due to the age and they didn’t have the funds.

You can help preserve a bit of the history of the town of Chapmanville and the general area by sharing your vintage photos here. To share a photo, please email it to the admin at loganwv.us@gmail.com. Please note that you must own the photo you are submitting or ensure that no one has a copyright claim on it.

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Whitman Mine Explosion, November 3, 1931

Whitman Mine Explosion

SEARCHERS FIND THIRD VICTIM OF LOGAN MINE BLAST.
EXPLOSION TRAPPED FIVE MEN IN ISLAND CREEK COMPANY WHITMAN MINE.
HOPE IS ABANDONED FOR TWO MISSING WORKERS.
MEN CAUGHT IN ABANDONED SECTION OF WORKINGS; 241 MINERS AT WORK IN MINE AT TIME OF BLAST; DEBRIS HAMPERS PROGRESS OF RESCUERS.

Logan, W. Va., Nov. 3. (AP) — With bodies of three miners recovered, rescue crews tonight pushed ahead in their search for two other men missing following an explosion in a temporarily abandoned section of Island Creek Coal company, Whitman Mine No. 20.
The bodies discovered were those of WILLIAM DINGESS, 48, father of nine children; DAVID AMOS, 36, father of four children, and ALONZO NAPLER, 29, father of six children. All were timbermen.

Virtually all hope was abandoned by rescue crews for the recovery alive of the two missing men, CHARLES FRYE, 31, fire boss, and JAMES HOBBS, 33, timberman.
The men were retimbering the unused section of the mine when, rescue workers believed, a slatefall occurred, breaking an electric wire and liberating a quantity of gas which was ignited by a spark from the wire. Rockdust in the mine, R. M. Lambie, chief of the state department of mines said at Charleston, prevented the explosion from spreading through the mine which extends underground for several miles from the foot of a 250-foot shaft.
Dust flying through the air gave warning to 241 other miners that an explosion had occurred some place in the workings and they hurried from the mine uninjured. One man was injured slightly when he was blown against a trap-door by the force of the blast. He had been working near the explosion area.

Rescue crews working under the direction of J. F. White, state mine inspector, and H. P. Farley, district safety director for the department of mines, located two of the bodies, those of DINGESS and AMOS, about two miles from the foot of the shaft where they had been engaged in retimbering. Several hours later after groping their way through thick fog composed of rockdust, coal particles and smoke, they found the third body, NAPLER, near the spot where the others had been located.

With the recovery of NAPLER’S body, a slight hope that he and the two other missing men might have escaped injury in the explosion and barricaded themselves in a mine room to keep out gas and smoke, was abandoned. Rescue workers, describing the conditions in the explosion area, said that although dust was so thick that it was “almost impossible to tell a man from a lump of coal.”

Bluefield Daily Telegraph West Virginia 1931-11-04

Source: www3.gendiasters.com
Link supplied by Lana Guiler. William Dingess was her grandfather.

*James Hobbs is buried in the Whitman Cemetery (information courtesy of Bob Piros). A link to his headstone and death certificate at FindAGrave.com is here.


Whitman Mine No. 20 courtesy of Toby Sabo.

Island Creek Mine No. 20, Whitman, WV courtesy of Toby Sabo.


Whitman Mine No. 20 courtesy of Toby Sabo.

Island Creek Mine No. 20, Whitman, WV courtesy of Toby Sabo.

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Monitor Road – A book by Carla Haslam

Monitor Road
~ a book by Carla Haslam Herkner

Monitor Road Book JacketMonitor Road is an American story about a young family nestled into their quiet Sunday routine in the coalfields of West Virginia.  It is a story about immigration, the blending of nationalities and gun violence that tears apart the Salino family.  It is also a story about perseverance, courage and love of family. On June 16, 1918, violence on Monitor Hill dissolves a family as gunshots echo throughout the valley…or does it?

The Author’s Biography

Carla Haslam Herkner is a retired public school teacher.  She was born in Logan, West Virginia, and is a wife, mother, grandmother, daughter and care giver. Carla graduated from West Virginia University in 1971 with a B.S. in Elementary Education.  She has a Master’s Degree in Counseling from Rowan University.  She is an active member of the West Chester Alumnae Association of Kappa Kappa Gamma Fraternity.

192 Illustrations/Pictures
264 Pages
$28.95

Published by Polyglot Press, Inc.
www.polyglotpress.com





A Follow Up

This wonderful gathering place for those of us who were born in or nearby Logan, has loyally hosted an ad for my book, “Monitor Road” for many months now. Here is a follow up to the story about my grandparents, Frank and Gertrude Salino who lived and worked at Monitor #3, Wilkinson. I have finally had the opportunity to visit the birthplace of my grandfather in Sezze, Italy. I still have many cousins there and my visit was one I’ll never forget.

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High Iron In The Hills

1955 Tracks Magazine  CoverCopyright, 1955, by the Chesapeake and Ohio Railway Co. Magazines and newspapers may reprint any of the material in this publication providing proper credit is given to ‘Tracks − C&O Rwy. Magazine.’

It’s steam, steel and coal at Peach Creek. Late in a chill February afternoon, the sun, growing old, bounces a coppery reflection off the track pattern in this West Virginia coal terminal. A Steamer, flaunting a wispy banner of vapor, girds herself for the tasks of hauling her long drag to the main line. She can do it and she knows it. More about the goings on in these parts in “High Iron In The Hills.”

 

High Iron In The Hills

There’s magic in the mountains of West Virginia, where iron men and iron horses tap the treasure vaults of King Coal.

Down in the valleys around Logan, W. VA., you can still hear that train blow. Any number of them blow, morning, noon and night and their music is not at the dirge the old balladeers made it out to be. Along the winding “runs,” the age-old creeks which carved out this jumbled mass of hills, powerful stream locomotives hug the walls of the timbered gorges as they snake their long trains from mines to assembly yard. Their piercing whistles and the full-throated bellow of their exhausts chant a lust work-song of “coal, coal, coal.”

Here where its Source of power lies locked in the treasure vaults of the mountains, the streamer is still monarch of all he surveys. When a diesel wanders into Peach Creek yard, it stands self-consciously, a stranger in an alien world. The eight-wheeled switchers, the barrel-bellied Mallets bustle officiously past the intruder, sassing it now and then with a derisive whistle hoot or a belligerent jet-last o steam this is their stronghold.

There is magic in these mountains, the enchantment of the high iron and the high wheeler, the saga of the black giant called Coal, who slumbered beneath the earth eons before men and machines awakened him to serve a nation. There is a story in the land and its people, for this region is a paradox. Only a few miles may separate the world of sleek motor cars, TV and rakish ranch houses from that of the buckboard, the dulcimer and the log cabin. Pioneer families who braved Indians and wilderness to settle here are remembered in their descendants, many of whom live on the original homesteads. But the modern era has brought new things, new names, new ways to this land and slowly the old order is changing.

Last month, to capture some of that magic, TRACKS went into the valleys of Logan County and came of them with the pictures and story which appear on these and the following pages.

March 1955, Tracks Magazine Photos

*The content on this page is for educational purposes and is used in accordance with the Fair Use Law (Per Title 17—United States Code—Section 107). This is a not-for-profit website and absolutely no commercial gain is derived from its operation and publication by the owner.

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1947 Logan High School

1947 Logan High School Yearbook Photos

1947 Logan High School Yearbook

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Unknown Faces

Unknown Faces of Logan County, WV

This page was created to help identify the unknown individuals in vintage Logan County photos. If you can identify anyone in these photos, please leave a comment or contact the admin.

Everyone is welcome to add a unknown photo to this gallery and in the Unknown Faces Facebook Group created for this purpose. If you wish to share a photo with this gallery, email it to the the admin at loganwv.us@gmail.com. Please note that you must own the photo you are submitting or ensure that no one has a copyright claim on it.

Unknown Faces

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When all of the faces in a photo are identified, the photo will be moved to our Friends and Families Gallery.

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Peach Creek, WV

This is a collection of photos of Peach Creek, WV. You can help preserve a bit of Logan County history by sharing your vintage photos with us. If you wish to share a photo with this site, please send it to the admin at loganwv.us@gmail.com. Please note that you must own the photo you are submitting or ensure that no one has a copyright claim on it.

Peach Creek, WV Photo Gallery

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